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BEST FOOTBALL VINES – NEW 2018 – GOALS, SKILLS, FAILS #11

by Joga Bonito

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– FIFA on GBP Sports

With exactly one month until Russia 2018 gets underway, FIFA Deputy Secretary General Zvonimir Boban discusses his own World Cup memories, expectations for Russia as the host nation and the first use of Video Assistant Referees (VAR) in the competition’s history.

With exactly one month until the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ gets underway, FIFA Deputy Secretary General Zvonimir Boban discusses various topics about the world finals, including his own personal memories of competing in the tournament, expectations for Russia as the host nation and the use of Video Assistant Referees (VAR) for the first time in the competition’s history.

Boban played in the successful Croatia squad that became one of the standout storylines from France 1998. Croatia were playing in their very first World Cup as an independent nation and managed to finish in third place. Now in an entirely different role, Boban knows exactly what a World Cup means and how it can impact an individual’s life.

From your own experience as a player in 1998, what goes through the mind of a player a month before the FIFA World Cup?
Zvonimir Boban: During the preparation time, I was full of concentration, full of emotions. You’re preparing yourself for something that’s always historic, whether you’re defeated or you win. Whatever happens, you’re taking part in one piece of history. We’re going to live a part of history in Russia for our sport. I’m excited but let’s say I’m more serious about the job I have to perform obviously! (laughs) We have an incredible partner and the Russian state is fully committed to running a great World Cup.

What are you expecting to see in Russia at the FIFA World Cup?
The World Cup is always something special, particularly emotional and unique, so there will be the underdogs who will do something great for their country, probably from small countries—I hope that it will be my Croatia obviously! What we’ll see there is something you can’t see or feel in other sports. It’s all the world in one place with a million or billion colours we might see with incredible passion for their countries, their teams and players. It’s not easy to describe the World Cup.

What do you expect from the Russians in terms of hospitality and atmosphere? 
I’m sure that in every sense when there is one competition and a big, incredible gathering like the World Cup, I believe we’ll see the best in a human sense, a hospitality sense, a football sense and in a cultural sense, too. In terms of security, for sure even flies without a Fan ID will not pass certain areas! I believe we’ll enjoy this World Cup completely.

For the first time in the FIFA World Cup, the VAR will be used. What is the philosophy of VAR?
The philosophy of VAR is about searching for more fairness in the game. Yes this is a heavy word, but we want more honesty in the game, for more correct results, for protecting the institution of football, protecting the referees. Referees are human beings, they’re not only referees. We also want to protect the destinies of players and to protect the investment made for many years that can vanish in one second because of the referee’s human eye—the referee’s a human being who can commit errors. What we’re doing is a clear sign of something that should have been done a long time ago.

The philosophy is maximum benefit with minimum interference. This is something we’re achieving in competitions in which VAR is used. I believe we’re doing something great. It’s a big step for football. FIFA together with the International Football Association Board (IFAB) have really been developing this system from scratch. The results have been outstanding. I can imagine for the public in Russia that some fans from some nations where VAR is not used will be surprised sometimes, but I believe they’ll understand and be informed about VAR if they’re coming to Russia. They can accept that this is something great for our game. At the end of the day, we are protecting the game, and this is the greatness of the VAR system.

How will VAR decisions be communicated to fans in stadiums during the 2018 FIFA World Cup?
We’ve developed this system of communication before in the stadiums. This is why you see the referee make the screen signal with his hands in the moment when he goes for a review. Our technology innovation department are doing a fantastic job. Everything in this World Cup will be displayed on the big screens in the stadiums, including the scenes, images and footage from the moment that the review is addressing. Also, there’ll be clear messaging on the screens indicating the decisions made through VAR. Everything will be shown on the big screens. In terms of communication, this means a lot for the people in the stadium.

What are your thoughts on how technology might influence the flow of the game?
We did an analysis with Belgian university KU Leuven and out of 100 matches VAR actually affects the play just one per cent for the game. It’s almost nothing. If you think about the fluidity of football, everyone thinks football is a very fluid game, but it’s not such a fluid game. At the last World Cup the ball was in play for 57 and a half minutes (on average). So already we are somehow losing 35 minutes or even more. We lose time on free-kicks, but for us this is a normal use of time. But it’s not actually normal that we’re losing nine minutes on average for free-kicks during a game, seven minutes on throw-ins, five-and-a-half on goal kicks and four-and-a-half on corner kicks.

We’re losing so much time on other things, so we should then be using 40 or 50 seconds to see if a game-changing error has been made, which can change the destinies of players, and not only the outcome of one game. It takes about one minute maximum for one review (on average). In a lot of cases it will be just 20 or 30 seconds. Our referees are the best referees in the world and they are so well trained. They’ve attended many workshops and have taken part in at least four FIFA tournaments. The majority also referee in competitions that are already using VAR, so we have top people for the top competition. I’m really confident that everything about VAR will be perfectly understood at the World Cup.

What is your message to the fans? 
My message is very simple: just go to the World Cup to enjoy football, enjoy Russia and enjoy the World Cup. It will be a special moment in their lives for sure.

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– FIFA on GBP Sports

With exactly one month until Russia 2018 gets underway, FIFA Deputy Secretary General Zvonimir Boban discusses his own World Cup memories, expectations for Russia as the host nation and the first use of Video Assistant Referees (VAR) in the competition’s history.

With exactly one month until the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ gets underway, FIFA Deputy Secretary General Zvonimir Boban discusses various topics about the world finals, including his own personal memories of competing in the tournament, expectations for Russia as the host nation and the use of Video Assistant Referees (VAR) for the first time in the competition’s history.

Boban played in the successful Croatia squad that became one of the standout storylines from France 1998. Croatia were playing in their very first World Cup as an independent nation and managed to finish in third place. Now in an entirely different role, Boban knows exactly what a World Cup means and how it can impact an individual’s life.

FIFA.com: From your own experience as a player in 1998, what goes through the mind of a player a month before the FIFA World Cup?
Zvonimir Boban: During the preparation time, I was full of concentration, full of emotions. You’re preparing yourself for something that’s always historic, whether you’re defeated or you win. Whatever happens, you’re taking part in one piece of history. We’re going to live a part of history in Russia for our sport. I’m excited but let’s say I’m more serious about the job I have to perform obviously! (laughs) We have an incredible partner and the Russian state is fully committed to running a great World Cup.

What are you expecting to see in Russia at the FIFA World Cup?
The World Cup is always something special, particularly emotional and unique, so there will be the underdogs who will do something great for their country, probably from small countries—I hope that it will be my Croatia obviously! What we’ll see there is something you can’t see or feel in other sports. It’s all the world in one place with a million or billion colours we might see with incredible passion for their countries, their teams and players. It’s not easy to describe the World Cup.

What do you expect from the Russians in terms of hospitality and atmosphere? 
I’m sure that in every sense when there is one competition and a big, incredible gathering like the World Cup, I believe we’ll see the best in a human sense, a hospitality sense, a football sense and in a cultural sense, too. In terms of security, for sure even flies without a Fan ID will not pass certain areas! I believe we’ll enjoy this World Cup completely.

For the first time in the FIFA World Cup, the VAR will be used. What is the philosophy of VAR?
The philosophy of VAR is about searching for more fairness in the game. Yes this is a heavy word, but we want more honesty in the game, for more correct results, for protecting the institution of football, protecting the referees. Referees are human beings, they’re not only referees. We also want to protect the destinies of players and to protect the investment made for many years that can vanish in one second because of the referee’s human eye—the referee’s a human being who can commit errors. What we’re doing is a clear sign of something that should have been done a long time ago.

The philosophy is maximum benefit with minimum interference. This is something we’re achieving in competitions in which VAR is used. I believe we’re doing something great. It’s a big step for football. FIFA together with the International Football Association Board (IFAB) have really been developing this system from scratch. The results have been outstanding. I can imagine for the public in Russia that some fans from some nations where VAR is not used will be surprised sometimes, but I believe they’ll understand and be informed about VAR if they’re coming to Russia. They can accept that this is something great for our game. At the end of the day, we are protecting the game, and this is the greatness of the VAR system.

How will VAR decisions be communicated to fans in stadiums during the 2018 FIFA World Cup?
We’ve developed this system of communication before in the stadiums. This is why you see the referee make the screen signal with his hands in the moment when he goes for a review. Our technology innovation department are doing a fantastic job. Everything in this World Cup will be displayed on the big screens in the stadiums, including the scenes, images and footage from the moment that the review is addressing. Also, there’ll be clear messaging on the screens indicating the decisions made through VAR. Everything will be shown on the big screens. In terms of communication, this means a lot for the people in the stadium.

What are your thoughts on how technology might influence the flow of the game?
We did an analysis with Belgian university KU Leuven and out of 100 matches VAR actually affects the play just one per cent for the game. It’s almost nothing. If you think about the fluidity of football, everyone thinks football is a very fluid game, but it’s not such a fluid game. At the last World Cup the ball was in play for 57 and a half minutes (on average). So already we are somehow losing 35 minutes or even more. We lose time on free-kicks, but for us this is a normal use of time. But it’s not actually normal that we’re losing nine minutes on average for free-kicks during a game, seven minutes on throw-ins, five-and-a-half on goal kicks and four-and-a-half on corner kicks.

We’re losing so much time on other things, so we should then be using 40 or 50 seconds to see if a game-changing error has been made, which can change the destinies of players, and not only the outcome of one game. It takes about one minute maximum for one review (on average). In a lot of cases it will be just 20 or 30 seconds. Our referees are the best referees in the world and they are so well trained. They’ve attended many workshops and have taken part in at least four FIFA tournaments. The majority also referee in competitions that are already using VAR, so we have top people for the top competition. I’m really confident that everything about VAR will be perfectly understood at the World Cup.

What is your message to the fans? 
My message is very simple: just go to the World Cup to enjoy football, enjoy Russia and enjoy the World Cup. It will be a special moment in their lives for sure.

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Super Ball Control Skills 2018

Football highlights by Dan1s

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– FIFA on GBP Sports

As kick-off at the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ edges closer every day, we at FIFA.com thought we would whet your appetite for the action.

With some outstanding games in store across June and July, we are going to focus in on highlights from some of the most memorable encounters from four years ago.

We were treated to excitement, drama, and an avalanche of goals at Brazil 2014, so what better way to get your imagination flowing for what may be around the corner this time!

Australia 2-3 Netherlands

18 June, Estadio Beira-Rio, Porto Alegre

While the Netherlands were flying high after seeing off Spain in their opening encounter, Australia were staring elimination in the face after a promising, but ultimately fruitless, 3-1 defeat to an impressive Chile side. The Socceroos needed to give it their all if they were to have a realistic chance of the next round. That necessity created a cocktail for a special match.

Arjen Robben, continuing his impressive start to the tournament, handed the Oranje the perfect start, but what followed was a back-and-forth five-goal thriller. While Australia left without the point they needed to keep their hopes alive, fans saw arguably their most memorable goal ever on the World Cup stage. Tim Cahill’s thunderbolt would later be nominated for the FIFA Puskas award.

The Netherlands would continue their march to bronze with a win over Chile in the final match of Group B, with Australia succumbing to Spain to leave without a point. However, Ange Postecoglou’s side certainly should not remember the tournament solely with disappointment, having served up an absolute classic in Porto Alegre.

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– FIFA on GBP Sports

Having proved reliable from the penalty spot for south London side Crystal Palace this 2017/18 Premier League season, Luka Milivojevic is aiming deliver for Serbia when it matters most, at the FIFA World Cup™.

  • Serbia’s Luka Milivojevic sets sights on Russia 2018 knockout stage
  • Heads to the FIFA World Cup with exceptional penalty record
  • Crystal Palace captain became a national team regular in qualifying

In the pressure cooker atmosphere of a FIFA World Cup™ shoot-out, a penalty-taker with nerves of steel and unshakeable confidence is an invaluable asset.

Serbia look to have that in Luka Milivojevic. In 15 months at Crystal Palace the defensive midfielder has already buried nine penalties, missing just one. This is hardly a long-honed attribute of his game, either, with Milivojevic having not scored from 12 yards professionally prior to his move to London. Instead, it was simply a matter of necessity.

“I practiced free-kicks a lot when Sam Allardyce was the manager and I was pretty successful in training,” the 27-year-old explained, talent he put to great use at Olympiakos in Greece and shown flashes of in England. “I think we were struggling with penalties as we had missed some in the past, and in a meeting in front of all the players, the manager asked me if I was confident enough to take them.”

Milivojevic has let his right foot do the talking ever since, answering his former boss with a resounding ‘yes’. Now, he will look to take his sharpshooting skills from the English Premier League to the World Cup.

On a high

Serbia head to Russia with dreams of escaping the group stages for the very first time as an independent nation, with the Palace man now a solid fixture of their setup. Having operated on the fringes of the squad in late 2012, Milivojevic found a home at the heart of their midfield under Slavoljub Muslin in qualifying and will be hoping that trend continues under Mladen Krstajic.

“I think [reaching the World Cup] is the biggest thing in my career so far,” he said, following a group stage exit at South Africa 2010. “It’s hard to get into, especially for teams from Europe. We had some good group matches and we qualified top of it, so I’m very excited to get to Russia.”

Milivojevic’s quality was recognised at an early age, when he was plucked from FK Rad to cross-town giants Red Star Belgrade by none other than former Yugoslavia and Croatia star Robert Prosinecki, with his leadership skills shining brightly. A mixed spell at Belgian heavyweights Anderlecht then preceded his move to Greece, where his career really took off.


© Getty Images

A race for second

Now in south London, he has remained on that trajectory, already sporting the captain’s armband as Palace recovered from a dire start to the season to comfortably stay in the top flight under former England boss Roy Hodgson. His settled look on the pitch replicates his feelings off it. “If you are happy outside of football, it can help you with your confidence,” he explained.

Krstajic will hope Milivojevic transports that confidence east, as reaching the knockout stages will be no pushover being paired with Costa Rica, Switzerland and a hotly-tipped Brazil. “The group is very strong,” the tough-tackling midfielder, who has 26 caps to date, admitted.

“When you’re playing against Brazil, you’re playing against the best national team in the world. They’re going to be favourites to win the World Cup, but I’m very excited to play against them.”

Expectations are high back home that they can find their way through, though. “I read in some Serbian newspapers that Brazil will be first in the group, we will be second, and then it’ll be Switzerland and Costa Rica. But I think people from Switzerland and Costa Rica will think the same as us,” Milivojevic conceded.

“If we finish second in the group, that will be a huge success for our national team, and even if we do we might then have to play against Germany!”

With the reigning champions having won their last six penalty shoot-outs, Serbia may end up thanking their lucky stars they have someone with no hang-ups about placing the ball on the spot.

Serbia’s dead-ball hall of fame

Dragan Stoijkovic: Italy 1990, France 1998 (Yugoslavia and FR Yugoslavia)
Sinisa Mihajlovic: France 1998 (FR Yugoslavia)
Aleksandr Kolarov: South Africa 2010 (Serbia)

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– FIFA on GBP Sports

Korea Republic coach Shin Taeyong has announced a provisional extended squad for next month’s 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™.

Among notable inclusions were Lee Seungwoo and veteran Lee Chungyong, who is set to make his third World Cup appearance. Young centre-back Kim Minjae and winger Yeom Kihun missed out due to injury, and were replaced by Oh Bansuk and Lee Chungyong respectively. Experienced midfielder Ki Sungyueng is likely to wear the captain’s armband.

All squads are provisional until the final list of 23 players is announced by FIFA, following their submission by participating teams, on 4 June.

Korea Republic provisional squad  
Goalkeepers:  Kim Seunggyu, Kim Jinhyeon, Cho Hyeonwoo

Defenders: Kim Younggwon, Jang Hyunsoo, Jeong Seunghyeon, Yun Yeongseon, Kwon Kyungwon, Oh Bansuk, Kim Jinsu, Kim Minwoo, Park Jooho, Hong Chul, Go Yohan, Lee Yong

Midfielders: Ki Sungyueng, Jeong Wooyoung, Kwon Changhoon, Ju Sejong, Koo Jacheol, Lee Jaesung, Lee Seungwoo, Moon Sunmin, Lee Chungyong

Forwards: Kim Shinwook, Son Heungmin, Hwang Heechan, Lee Keunho

Reserves: Gu Sungyun (goalkeeper), Son Junho, Lee Myungjoo, Lee Changmin, Ji Dongwon (midfielders), Suk Hyunjun (forward)

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Team Wellington sight continental crown – FIFA on GBP Sports

Team Wellington are within touching distance of their maiden OFC Champions League title and a spot at the FIFA Club World Cup after a one-sided opening leg of the final on Sunday.

Despite the gloomy conditions in the New Zealand capital, it was perfect afternoon for the home side after a second half onslaught secured a 6-0 win over Lautoka.

The Fijians were still in the contest approaching the hour-mark with Ross Allen’s 16th-minute goal all that separated the teams.

However, Team Wellington rattled in four without reply during a remarkable 14-minute period, which also included a red card for the visitors’ Praneel Naidu.

Jack-Henry Sinclair scored the first of a double with Andrew Bevin and Mario Barcia also netting, before Taylor Schrijvers added extra insurance six minutes from fulltime.

Team Wellington, who have been runners-up for the past three years, ended Auckland City’s seven-year continental reign in the semi-final last month.

The return leg in Lautoka will be played next Sunday with a ticket to UAE 2018 awaiting the victor.

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EL CLÁSICO: How Zidane’s Real Madrid Almost Broke Valverde’s Barcelona’s Unbeaten Run: Tactics

by Tactical Analysis Hub

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L3vant3 Vs Barcelona 5–4 – All Goals & Highlights – Resumen y Goles 13/05/2018 HD

Football highlights by NugoBasilaiaa

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